News

Then a bold, if slightly desperate, idea came to him. In his brushes with the professional journalism crowd, he’d heard about an increasingly popular school of thought: if the press is a public service, it ought to be publicly funded.
Big stories and essential reporting don’t protect the Florida Times-Union from a fresh round of staff cuts.
Dr. Seema Yasmin, who studies the overlap of news deserts and health deserts, told Brian Stelter that those of us who live in news deserts are more likely to face not just a pandemic, but also a misinfodemic that fuels the spread of the disease. Speaking on Reliable Sources on CNN on Nov. 15, 2020, she said the press is “immune system of a democracy.”
In October, Gannett offered a round of voluntary buyouts to all its employees. Poynter has learned that roughly 600 people opted in and roughly 500 buyouts were accepted... “Gannett’s furloughs earlier this year and the recent buyouts undermine our democracy,” said Jon Schleuss, president of The NewsGuild — Communications Workers of America. “It’s a disgrace that any news company thinks it can cut its way to success.”
“In a smaller community or even a city the size of Shreveport/Bossier, you need enough journalists to cover what’s happening in the city government, what’s happening at the parish level, what’s happening at the state level, especially what’s happening down in Baton Rouge,” NewsGuild President Jon Schleuss said.
In a pair of interviews with Tom Hall at Midday on WYPR, journalism advocates Margaret Sullivan and Jon Schleuss warned of the dangers facing communities that lose access to local news.

Brian Stelter speaks with reporters in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where Tribune Publishing is cutting costs by closing the century-old newsroom at The Morning Call newspaper. Reporter Jennifer Sheehan says "we need to have a home base. We need to have a place that we can come collaborate."

Watch video here.

When the The Casper Star-Tribune this summer announced it would only print five editions per week -- leaving Wyoming with not a single local newspaper that prints every day -- it was “a symbolic punch”  to the gut for the paper’s newsroom staff, former reporter Seth Klamann recalled.