Save The News | Life-Saving News Needs a Stimulus

America’s access to life-saving news is at risk. COVID-19 and its economic impact have devastated news outlets, causing tens of thousands of furloughs, layoffs, and pay cuts.

We depend on news more than ever to get the latest information on our communities and to keep our families safe. This crisis threatens the journalists and newsrooms that keep that critical information flowing.

Congress can save critical newsrooms by including aid in future recovery packages. Our leaders must come together and take decisive action to prevent community news from going extinct.

Tell Congress to Save The News!

News is an essential service and our country can’t afford to lose it during this pandemic. Journalists and other media workers are working on never-ending deadlines and risking their own health to provide life-saving information to a nation sheltering in place.

Local news allows readers to cut away from national headlines, navigate through some of the biases that plague cable news, and get to the true issues that are affecting their communities. It’s easy to imagine a story like this slipping through the cracks. Only the efforts of Anjeanette Damon and her colleagues at Reno Gazette Journal brought it to the attention of local readers.
The very framework of democracy in America is being weakened by the rapid, widespread demise of local news organizations, particularly small newspapers that once served as trusted providers of information and pillars of their communities, according to Margaret Sullivan, who spoke virtually to a South Dakota audience on Tuesday, June 30.
As Ken Doctor put it on Monday, "this is the mid-year witching hour for the U.S. daily press," with numerous possible outcomes. McClatchy's biggest investor Chatham might end up with the newspaper chain. Or Gannett. Or a group of investors from the "growing civic-good journalism world" who could set up "the country's first major nonprofit newspaper chain."

NewsGuild journalists representing 10 Tribune Publishing Co. publications across the country are launching a collective campaign to return these institutions to local ownership.

Journalists at the Chicago Tribune have resorted to begging for new owners, the Times reported. Some editors have already left.

“Think about what a strong base that is and how numerous a number is down at the bottom, so it feeds through to the top. The New York Times ultimately depends on what the Capital Gazette writes, in many ways to determine the agenda at the national level,” Abernathy said. Capital journalist Selene San Felice memorialized her slain colleagues and pleaded with the audience to find a way to save The Capital.
The only thing canceling your subscription to a newspaper will do is hasten the death of journalism itself. It will leave your community with even fewer full-time reporters to tell you what local leaders were up to while you weren’t paying attention. It will leave you with a far poorer understanding of the place where you live
The North Carolina journalism professor’s latest report out this week details the industry’s decline from 2004 through 2019, a period that saw the loss of more than 2,000 newspapers and a 44% drop in circulation overall.